qualified (DC)

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The Newton Manuscript Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Newton Manuscript Project began in January 2000 with a view to preparing 20 print volumes of Newton's non-scientific papers. Although we had stated in the initial application that that we would make the text of the proposed print edition available online, we quickly realised that the online environment now offered extraordinary and unrivalled possibilities for disseminating high quality scholarly output to a variety of audiences. Accordingly, we switched our primary focus to producing an electronic edition of Newton’s non-scientific papers.

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Pacific Pathways: Multiplying Contexts for the Forster ('Cook-Voyage') Collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Comprising 185+ artefacts obtained on James Cook’s second voyage of discovery from 1772 to 1775, the Forster Collection is one of the great collections of Pacific ethnography. Between 1995 and 2001, I gathered together in a database all the information held within the Museum about each object in the collection. This work culminated in the launch of a website devoted to the collection at . The present project was concerned with understanding the ways in which the Forster Collection is important today, especially for members of ‘source’ communities.

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Conceptions of cultural studies in Cassirer's theory of symbolic forms

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

"Ernst Cassirer was a noted philosopher of culture and the sciences at Hamburg until 1933, and he was granted a LL.D. by the law faculty of the University of Glasgow – hence it is appropriate for the University of Glasgow to be the site of this project. Cassirer’s most creative period in Germany occurred after he discovered the Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek Warburg, and this epoch is best documented by the correspondence and other documents housed today in the archive of the Warburg Institute, part of the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Academic field
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Urban connectivity in Iron-Age and Roman Southern Spain

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Urban Connectivity in Iron Age and Roman southern Spain Project, funded by the AHRC between 2002 and 2005 with subsequent support by the University of Southampton and institutions in Seville, has been studying changing social, economic and geographical relationships between some 195 towns and nucleated settlements in central and western Baetica between c.500 BC and AD 200. The project has the following five research questions, based on data gathered in the field and through archival research between 2002 and 2008:

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The complete work of Charles Darwin online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Darwin Online is by far the largest Darwin publication in history. It contains over 40,000 pages of searchable text and 130,000 electronic images. This site contains at least one exemplar of all known Darwin publications, reproduced to the highest scholarly standards, both as searchable text and electronic images of the originals.

Academic field
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Siobhan Davies Dance Online

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Siobhan Davies Dance Online is a project that created a fully searchable, online, digital archive of the work of the choreographer Siobhan Davies. In addition to extensive film footage of performances and rehearsals, photographs, programmes etc. it includes scholarly articles, performance reviews, interviews with audience members, analytical commentaries from Siobhan Davies, some of the dancers with the company and others plus a number of other artefacts.

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Semantic Tools for Archaeological Resources

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Increasingly within archaeology, the Web is used for dissemination of datasets. This contributes to the growing amount of information on the ‘deep web’, which a recent Bright Planet study estimated to be 500 times larger than the ‘surface web’. However Google and other web search engines are ill equipped to retrieve information from the richly structured databases that are key resources for humanities scholars. Important archaeological results and reports are also appearing as grey literature, before or instead of traditional publication.

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Digitisation of the South Asian oral history archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Centre of South Asian Studies won a Resource Enhancement Grant from the AHRC to begin the digitisation of its oral history collections. There are around 300 recordings in this collection, mostly held on audio cassette, with some reel-to-reel tape recordings as well. The project was completed in 2009 - the interviews, transcripts and various search functions are now available on the Centre of South Asian Studies' website.

Academic field
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TEXTvre

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

TEXTvre will support the complete lifecycle of research in e-humanities textual studies by providing researchers with advanced services to process and analyse research texts that are held in formally managed, metadata-rich institutionally-based repositories. The access and analysis of textual research data will be supported by annotation and retrieval technology and will provide services for every step in the digital research life cycle.

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