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Patterns of Mozart reception in the nineteenth century

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The history of nineteenth-century music is on the verge of being rewritten. There is emerging, in addition to a chronicle of composers and works, and of a thick description of musical cultures and institutions, the possibility of writing the music history of the century in terms of its reception of composers of the previous century and before. The fusion of traditional modes of historical narrative with views of the century that give due weight to questions of reception is one of the most exciting opportunities facing music history today.

Academic field
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Law and Empire, AD 193-455: the Projet Volterra (2)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The general aims of the Projet Volterra (named, in association with the École Française de Rome, in honour of Edoardo Volterra (1904-1987), the distinguished scholar of Roman Law) are to promote the study of Roman legislation in its full social, political and legal context, and its continuing tradition. The area of Roman imperial legal pronouncements was identified as one in which current scholarship was less than adequately served in terms of Regesten, repertoria and bibliographical aids.

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English landholding in Ireland, c1200-c1360

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project can be located within several overlapping historiographical contexts, which have shown a capacity to enlarge our understanding. These include the interactions between 'core' and 'peripheral' areas of Europe; the complex relationships between the countries and regions of the British Isles; and the ubiquitous debates about colonization, cultural transfer, and the formation of identities, in which medievalists have increasingly been involved. Studies of elites and landholding are fundamental to an understanding of such issues.

Academic field
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The correspondence of Aby Warburg and the Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek Warburg: an electronic catalogue of the Warburg Institute archive

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Warburg Institute holds the working papers and correspondence of the Hamburg scholar Aby Warburg, as well as the papers of the institute which he founded and which still bears his name. The project is designed to provide a searchable database and catalogue of Warburg's entire correspondence (some 35,000 letters), with all proper names and major topics identified and recorded. The correspondence is important not just for the study of Warburg himself.

Academic field
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Fontes Anglo-Saxonici

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Fontes Anglo-Saxonici: A Register of Written Sources Used by Authors in Anglo-Saxon England is intended to identify all written sources which were incorporated, quoted, translated or adapted anywhere in English or Latin texts which were written in Anglo-Saxon England (i.e. England to 1066), or by Anglo-Saxons in other countries.

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A database for provenance research of Chinese works of art, piloting the Burrell Collection

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The outcome of the project is a compilation of sources for provenance research of Chinese works of art, for use by institutions and researchers. Using The Burrell Collection in Glasgow as a pilot, the project documents records relating to dealers and collectors who specialised in Chinese art during the first half of the twentieth century.

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Cataloguing the Papers of Wilfred Ward (1856-1916)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Papers of the Roman Catholic Modernist movement held in St Andrews University Library are of central importance to the study of Roman Catholic theology in the late nineteenth and early 20th century. Amongst the group, the papers of Wilfrid Ward (1856-1916) are of great importance. Prior to this project, they were the only element of the broader collection which did not benefit from internet-deliverable detailed listing.

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The Parsed Corpus of Early English Correspondence

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Parsed Corpus of Early English Correspondence is a syntactically-annotated version of 2.2 million words of the Corpus of Early English Correspondece (created by the Sociolinguistics and Language History project team at the Department of English, University of Helsinki). It includes 84 letter collections, consisting of 4790 letters dating from 1410 to 1695. The corpus is annotated with the grammatical and sociolinguistic information necessary for extensive (socio-)linguistic analysis.

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European Critical Heritage : The Reception of British and Irish Authors in Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Research Project documents fully the Continental reception of major British and Irish writers including Virginia Woolf, Lawrence Sterne, Jonathan Swift, Lord Byron, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Henry James, James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, each of whom made powerful and innovatory contributions to a genre and style that came to dominate modern literature.

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