Law

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Victorian Social Reform: A Bibliography of the Published Papers of the Social Science Association 1857-86

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, known as the Social Science Association, was an influential forum for the development of social policy between the 1850s and 1880s to which many notable Victorians gave papers and addresses. Leading politicians, intellectuals, bureaucrats, churchmen and businessmen were among its members. It was influential in many different areas - legal reform, penal policy, education, public health and commercial relations – and provides vivid insight into Victorian social and institutional development.

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Law making in Wales: an on-line analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

On 1 July 1999 the National Assembly for Wales came into existence. Its functions were, and continue to be, transferred by Orders in Council and Acts of Parliament. This is a unique arrangement under the various devolution settlements introduced in the UK at this time. A basic element of the rule of law is that citizens can access the law. It was not apparent to the project team that the National Assembly had any plans to make its functions routinely accessible to any user, whether these were transferred to it, or functions that it legislated for itself under its statutory powers.

Academic field
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French Vernacular Books: A Short-Title Catalogue of Books in the French language published before 1601

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The St Andrews French Book Project intends to create an analytical bibliography of all books published in the French language before 1601. It is the first ever global survey of early French books, based on an exhaustive investigation of over 1550 libraries worldwide. It is also the first major national bibliographical project to have been designed and completed entirely in the electronic age.

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Law and Empire, AD 193-455: the Projet Volterra (2)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The general aims of the Projet Volterra (named, in association with the École Française de Rome, in honour of Edoardo Volterra (1904-1987), the distinguished scholar of Roman Law) are to promote the study of Roman legislation in its full social, political and legal context, and its continuing tradition. The area of Roman imperial legal pronouncements was identified as one in which current scholarship was less than adequately served in terms of Regesten, repertoria and bibliographical aids.

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ICTGuides

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The ICTGuides project is now incorporated within this project (arts-humanities.net).

Two developments gave birth to the ICTGuides database: an increase in the use of ICT in arts and humanities research and an awareness that information on how ICT is used in arts-humanities research is not readily available online. The resulting disparity was largely seen to have detrimental effects on ICT-based scholarship as sharing computational expertise among scholars is a precursor to promoting innovation within the field.

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Co-edited commentary on Augustine, City of God

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Augustine, bishop (397-430) of Hippo in North Africa, was one of the most influential writers of the western world. He wrote City of God (De Civitate Dei, 412-26) in response to charges that Gothic troops were able to sack the 'eternal city' of Rome (410) because the gods of Rome were offended by Christian neglect.

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The Bentham Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Bentham Project, part of UCL's Faculty of Laws, is preparing a new authoritative edition of The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham, which is being published by Oxford University Press. The twenty-sixth volume to be published will appear in 2005. It is anticipated that, when complete, the edition will run to sixty-eight volumes. Each volume contains an Editorial Introduction, full annotation, and comprehensive name and subject indexes.

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The Scottish Parliament Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Scottish Parliament Project, based at the University of St Andrews, was set up in 1997 with funding from the Scottish Office, and has since received its funding from the Scottish Executive and a number of academic funding bodies. Its main task has been to create a new online edition of the acts of the pre-1707 Scottish Parliament (c.16,000,000 words), the Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707 (RPS), with a parallel translation of the original Latin, French, Gaelic and Scots into standard searchable English.

Academic field
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Digital catalogue of illuminated manuscripts in the Western Collections of the British Library (DigCIM)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Project provides catalogue descriptions and images of illuminated manuscripts in the British Library's collection on a collection-by-collection basis. Thus far, entries for illuminated manuscripts in all of the Library's collections are available online and can be found via the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts website at:

www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts

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