Mediterranean

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Inscriptions of Aphrodisias project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The aim is to publish as many as possible of the Greek inscriptions from Aphrodisias in Caria online, in order both to provide far fuller documentation than a book allows, and to meet the problems of the dissemination of expensive publications.
In so doing, we aim to develop and establish technological standards (using TEI compliant XML) which other epigraphers can use; we are trying to discuss the project with as many experts as possible, in the UK, US and Europe.

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Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project is investigating human activity across the landscape during all time periods, using intensive archaeological and geomorphological survey. TAESP is working in a broad area of the north-central Troodos mountains that includes fertile valleys and plains, copper-bearing foothills, and the northern part of the Troodos Range itself. Other than some rescue excavation of tombs, no systematic archaeological work had been done in this area, and none at all in the mountains.

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An English/Greek terminology for the structures and materials of Byzantine and Greek bookbinding

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Research problem:
To compile a definitive bilingual glossary to describe Byzantine/Greek bookbindings by combining both the existing partial and conflicting terminologies and the new terms necessitated by the St. Catherine's library survey.

Aims and objectives:
The overall objective of the project is the production of a bilingual glossary to describe the structure and materials of Byzantine/Greek bookbinding. Several secondary aims must be achieved for the project to be successful. These are:

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The origin and spread of stock-keeping in the Near East and Europe

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

In western Eurasia we know that the earliest evidence for domestic farmyard animals occurs around 10,000 years ago. We also know that farming then spread westwards through Europe over the subsequent millennia, arriving in the far west and north of Europe some 6,000 years ago. For decades there have been major debates as to the nature of this spread, with many basic questions still remaining largely unanswered. The objective of this major research project, which has been funded for four years by the AHRC, is to address these questions.

Academic field
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Around 1968: Activism, Networks, Trajectories

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This is a study of militants, the networks they constructed and the trajectories they followed in Europe between 1965-75. It is a collective project, undertaken by 14 historians, 7 based in the UK, 7 outside. It is based on archival work and the collection of oral testimony from a sample of networks and activists involved in them in each country.

Academic field
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Greek Bible in Byzantine Judaism (GBBJ )

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The project's mandate is to gather evidence for the use of Greek Bible translations by Jews in the Middle Ages, to edit and publish these remains, to subject them to linguistic analysis, and to compare them with other Greek biblical texts, earlier, contemporary and later. the corpus developed by the project comprises the exact remains of Jewish Greek Bible versions, edited from manuscripts. They include continuous texts, glossaries in Jewish sources, scholia, and marginalia in Christian manuscripts.

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Post-Colonial Negotiations: Visualising the Franco-Algerian Relationship in the Post-War Period

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

This project will consider how colonial and post-colonial relations between France and Algeria have been represented since the outbreak of the Algerian War (1954-62), and will track the shifting way in which the idea or myth of 'Algeria' has been constructed, portrayed and understood in France during that time. The results will be disseminated through the blog and multi-media postcards as well as academic outputs.

Academic field
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Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC)

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization.

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