Creation

section icon

LEAVING HOME, FINDING HOME: STORIES BY SOUTH ASIAN WOMEN WITHIN THE US

Posted by Jashodhara Sen on February 15, 2018

LEAVING HOME, FINDING HOME is a digital storytelling space by and for the immigrant women from South Asia residing and attending universities in the United States (South Asian countries: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Maldives, Sri Lanka). As a South Asian academic, immigrant, and digital archivist for this platform, I invite women who identify as South Asian to share their powerful stories related to immigration, identity, freedom, and equality.

Help type
section icon

Heurist Knowledge Management System

Posted by Ian Johnson on March 7, 2017

HEURIST is a flexible Open Source data management system which allows any confident researcher or data manager to design, create, manage, analyse and publish richly-structured database(s) within hours, through a simple web interface, without need of programmers or consultants. It is aimed at a broad range of Humanities data, characterised by rich text, multimedia, relationships, categorisation, uncertain data, spatial and temporal information, and the need to work collaboratively while maintaining access control. It allows incremental changes in database structure - existing data are not affected - allowing projects to start small and simple and evolve as the research develops.

section icon

The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project

Posted by Sarah Ketchley on January 19, 2017

Emma B. Andrews is best remembered for her association with the millionaire lawyer turned archaeologist/art and antiquities collector, Theodore M. Davis. Traveling to Egypt with him between 1889 and 1912, she kept detailed journals of these voyages along the Nile, including his important yet under-reported excavations of 20 significant tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Emma provides a vital commentary on the archaeology and pioneering Egyptologists of the time.

Help type
section icon

The Prague Spring Archive

Posted by Ian Goodale on January 5, 2017

The University of Texas at Austin Libraries have partnered with the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies to digitize archival materials from the LBJ Presidential Archive’s collections and make them accessible via a portal created with Scalar. 

section icon

Mapping At The Mountains of Madness

Posted by Matt Mckinley on December 14, 2016

This story map is an attempt to geographically chart both the real fictional locations detailed in Lovecraft's novella, At the Mountains of Madness.

In At The Mountains of Madness, Lovecraft's first-person writing style lends the reader an account of the names and coordinates of both real and imagined places, displaying the overlap between Lovecraft's fictional universe and our human world.

section icon

Eighteenth-Century Poetry Archive

Posted by Alexander Huber on May 1, 2016

The Eighteenth-Century Poetry Archive — ECPA — is a collaborative digital archive and research project devoted to the poetry of the long eighteenth century. Edited and annotated collaboratively, the growing ECPA corpus builds on the electronic texts created by the Text Creation Partnership from Gale’s Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO). ECPA was founded and is edited by Alexander Huber, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford (editor of the Thomas Gray Archive).

section icon

Apprenticeship in Early Modern Venice: the Garzoni project

Posted by Maud Ehrmann on April 1, 2016

Led by an interdisciplinary consortium, the Garzoni project undertakes the study of apprenticeship, work and society in early modern Venice by focusing on a specific archival source, namely the `Accordi dei Garzoni' from the Venetian State Archives. The project revolves around two main phases with, in the first instance, the design and the development of tools to extract and render information contained in the documents (according to Semantic Web standards) and, as a second step, the examination of such information.

section icon

Novels Reviewed Database

Posted by Megan Peiser on September 26, 2015

Database of reviews of novels from The Critical Review and The Monthly Review from 1790-1820.

This project seeks to understand the contepmorary critical response to the only period in literary history when women published more novels than men.

 

Pages