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Lebanese Virtual Museum of Modern Art

Posted by Digital Humanit... on June 9, 2016

The Digital Humanities Section, together with the Lebanese Ministry of Culture, and the Académie Libanaise des Beaux-Arts, has developed the first virtual reality museum in Lebanon. It includes more than 500 works of art (Paintings and sculpture) out of a collection of the Ministry of Culture that includes 1800 works by Lebanese plastic artists.​

This virtual museum offers the following services:

 

​The Permanent Collection:

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Old Testament, New Tricks: Using Biblical Translation to Examine Word Sense and Popular Belief

Posted by Zach Bleemer on March 27, 2016

This project presents a novel framework and empirical technique using digital tools and a small but highly-structured dataset--namely, 14 translations of the Old Testament--to analyze latent beliefs regarding beautiful objects across three broadly-defined populations: 16th century Great Britain, 20th century Germany, and the contemporary United States.

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Novels Reviewed Database

Posted by Megan Peiser on September 26, 2015

Database of reviews of novels from The Critical Review and The Monthly Review from 1790-1820.

This project seeks to understand the contepmorary critical response to the only period in literary history when women published more novels than men.

 

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Digital Zombies

Posted by juliette Levy on August 13, 2015

Digital Zombies is a hybrid research experience that leads students through digital and physical collections in libraries while teaching them the basics of scholarly historical research. The sequence of tasks constitute a meaningful play activity – not a video game or even a gamification – but it is firmly a digital experience, as students learn to navigate digital collections, learn to search online for books that are in the library, and develop digital literacy around search engines, file submissions and file formats.

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Digital Mishnah Project

Posted by Hayim Lapin on April 22, 2015

The Digital Mishnah Project aims to create a born digital edition of the Mishnah providing transcription of witnesses, alignment of variant readings, tools for statistical study of relationships among the texts (including stemmatology). In collaboration with other projects it will also provide morphological analysis of lexical items and aligned translation.

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Documenting Teresa Carreño

Posted by Anna Kijas on March 18, 2015

Documenting Teresa Carreño is an open-access project, which will bring together select primary source materials, such as advertisements, announcements, and reviews from newspapers, with descriptions or annotations in order to document Carreño's career from 1862 - 1917. Access to criticism and reception of her performances, as well as other primary source documents, will be provided in original format when available or through transcription.

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Designing Shakespeare: an audio-visual archive 1960-2000

Posted by Christie Carson on February 26, 2015

Research Questions and Problems
Can a comprehensive audio-visual archive of performance information encourage further research into performance in English Departments and support teaching in Drama and Theatre Studies Departments?

Can oral history interviews with designers add significantly to the study of performance?

Can access to a large database of digital images based around a design theme encourage greater emphasis on the visual elements of performance for scholars and students of Shakespeare?

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Digital Dickens Working Notes Project

Posted by Anna Gibson on January 9, 2015

The Dickens Notes Project will digitize Charles Dickens's working notes for his novels alongside their serial parts. The project will provide scholars and students with a comprehensive and interactive fluid edition of Dickens's working notes that highlights the connections between notes and novel, annotates the notes, and demonstrates the process of Dickens's serial form.

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Beyond Citation: Critical Thinking About Digital Research

Posted by Eileen Clancy on December 28, 2014

We want to be the "Missing Manual" for digital research collections. While the use of databases such as ProQuest’s Historical Newspapers or Gales’ Nineteenth Century Collections Online is common, these tools have largely escaped critique by traditional humanities scholars. Knowledge of the way proprietary databases work is limited because their structures and content are opaque. As a result, scholars may not be able to discover the provenance of documents or to understand why certain search results are returned.

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Neatline

Posted by Ronda Grizzle on August 13, 2014

Neatline is a geotemporal exhibit-builder that allows you to create beautiful, complex maps, image annotations, and narrative sequences from Omeka collections of archives and artifacts, and to connect your maps and narratives with timelines that are more-than-usually sensitive to ambiguity and nuance. Neatline lets you make hand-crafted, interactive stories as interpretive expressions of a single document or a whole archival or cultural heritage collection.

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