poetry

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Laboring-Class Poets Online

Posted by Cole Crawford on June 20, 2017

Laboring-Class Poets Online is a database-driven website that aggregates biographical and bibliographical information about the more than 2,000 laboring-class poets who published between 1700 and 1900 and the texts they produced. It functions as a clearinghouse for data about poets from the lower classes who lived in the British Isles or in British colonies, and thereby helps demonstrate the importance of laboring-class writing to social and literary history.

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Eighteenth-Century Poetry Archive

Posted by Alexander Huber on May 1, 2016

The Eighteenth-Century Poetry Archive — ECPA — is a collaborative digital archive and research project devoted to the poetry of the long eighteenth century. Edited and annotated collaboratively, the growing ECPA corpus builds on the electronic texts created by the Text Creation Partnership from Gale’s Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO). ECPA was founded and is edited by Alexander Huber, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford (editor of the Thomas Gray Archive).

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MARGENTO: Poetry Computational Graphs

Posted by Chris Tanasescu... on March 16, 2015

The SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) awarded project Poetry Computational Graphs aims to read, categorize, classify, and analyze poetry by means of computer programming and graph theory applications.

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Thomas Gray Archive

Posted by Alexander Huber on November 13, 2012

The Thomas Gray Archive is a fully browseable, searchable and annotated digital archive of the life and works of Thomas Gray (1716-1771), one of the most versatile 18th-century poets. The Archive aims to make Gray's work accessible to scholars, teachers, students, and the general reader. It provides access to high quality primary sources and secondary materials and constitutes a networked effort of institutions and individuals engaged in making Gray's works available digitally, thus partaking in and benefiting from collaborative scholarship online.

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Edna St. Vincent Millay Personal Library Catalog

Posted by Amanda French on December 1, 2011

When Edna St. Vincent Millay died in 1950, her sister Norma moved in to her home, called Steepletop, in Austerlitz, NY. Ever since 1950, Millay's personal library has remained relatively undisturbed. Over the years, one or two casual inventories of the books were made, but they are filled with errors, and they've never been published nor put into digital form. This project aims to create an accurate digital catalog of the library and to record as much as possible of the inscriptions and marginalia in the works.