Theory & Practice

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The Pompey Project: the evolution, structure and legacy of the Theatre of Pompey

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The first scientific study of Rome’s first permanent theatre. Comprehensive documentation of all surviving remains, supplemented by new limited excavation at specific points targeted by our initial analysis. Creation of a definitive series of site-plans, sections, elevations keyed to a complete photographic record, and measured drawings. We have prepared an extensive archaeological register recording the details of every known artefact discovered on the site of the theatre complex for the past five centuries.

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Adolphe Appia at Hellerau: Virtual Reconstructions and performances

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Using both photographs of historic settings and original designs, virtual reality models were created of Appia's "rhythmic spaces", and their lighting and other properties. Mixed reality performance technology was used to integrate both video footage and live action into these virtual settings. In addition, a highly detailed VR model of the Hellerau Festspielhaus, where some of Appia's designs were realised for innovative performance, was created. Then, using historic photographs, sets recorded in archive photos were placed into the great hall at Hellerau, and lit under various conditions.

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ICTGuides

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The ICTGuides project is now incorporated within this project (arts-humanities.net).

Two developments gave birth to the ICTGuides database: an increase in the use of ICT in arts and humanities research and an awareness that information on how ICT is used in arts-humanities research is not readily available online. The resulting disparity was largely seen to have detrimental effects on ICT-based scholarship as sharing computational expertise among scholars is a precursor to promoting innovation within the field.

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Activated Space: the transformation of internal spaces to become audible and interactive

Posted by David Cunningham on March 29, 2015

Activated Space is a proposal to develop and present a series of installations that alter an architectural space to allow its resonant frequencies to become audible and interactive. The proposal combines elements from sculpture, electronic media, music, architecture and acoustics.

research questions:

Primary:
How can active listening be encouraged?
How does our awareness of acoustic surroundings influence our perceptions?
What happens if you magnify the sound of a room?

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Town and Townscape: The Work and Life of Thomas Sharp

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Thomas Sharp (1901-1978) was a key figure in town planning in the mid-twentieth century. The concepts he developed in his writings and plans have been of enduring significance and influence on thinking about planning and design for both practitioners and academics in the UK and beyond. He was a key figure in defining thinking about the forms that town and countryside should take; in reconciling existing and valued character with modernity, and; in making these arguments accessible through a series of polemical books.

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Virtual Reconstruction of Palladio’s Teatro Olimpico

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Teatro Olimpico at Vicenza, Italy - still existent and well preserved - was built in 1580-85 for the local Accademia Olimpica (founded in 1556) on a plot provided by the city council. It was the first permanent theatre to be built in Europe since antiquity. The stage, which resembles a façade of a Renaissance palace, and the semi-oval sitting area were designed by the architect and founding member of the Accademia, Andrea Palladio (1508-80). He died soon after the work began; his son, Silla took over.

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Virtual Recreation of Palladio’s Villa Rotonda

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Villa Rotonda, also known as Villa Capra or Villa Almerico-Valmarana, is one of the best known works by the Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio (1508-80). It was built just outside Vicenza, Italy, in the countryside, as a retirement residence for the clergyman at the Vatican, Paolo Almerico. The work began in c. 1565/6. Although the villa was inhabited by 1569 it was still unfinished by the time of Almerico’s death in 1589. The next owners, the brothers Odorico and Marco Capra commissioned a student of Palladio, the architect Vincenzo Scamozzi (1552-1616) to complete the villa.

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3D Reconstruction of the Unbuilt Project Pont destiné à réunir la France à l’Italie (1829) by Henri Labrouste

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Henri Labrouste (1801-75) is best known as the architect of two important public buildings in Paris, both libraries. The Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, completed in 1851, demonstrated Labrouste's unconventional use of classical elements, much disputed at the time, and his structural innovation of introducing an exposed iron frame. The Bibliothèque Nationale, completed in the year of his death, is renowned for its eclectic reading room reminiscent of a Seljuk mosque: a light, top-lit round space with slender cast-iron columns, which support a multitude of small domes.

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Dictionary of Scottish Architects

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Dictionary of Scottish Architects is a database with biographies and full job lists for all those who practised in Scotland after 1840. This includes not only men and women who were born in Scotland but also those from elsewhere who designed buildings and entered competitions here. It is available over the internet without restriction. During the first 3-year period which was funded by the AHRC the Dictionary covered the period up to 1940; at the start of 2008, the inclusion of post-1940 architects was begun. It is anticipated that this new project will be completed in 2011.

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A Corpus of Scottish Medieval Parish Churches

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

Apart from a few widely known examples, such as Edinburgh St Giles or Perth St John, the medieval parish churches of Scotland are very rarely dealt with in discussions of architecture in Britain in the Middle Ages. This is largely because they have never been systematically studied as a body, and there is surprisingly little knowledge of how much of medieval date survives. Indeed, it became clear some years ago that even the Church of Scotland itself was largely unaware of the medieval origins of the core of its stock of parish churches.

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