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The Old Bailey Online, 1674-1834

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Old Bailey Proceedings form one of the largest bodies of published text ever created, detailing the lives and experiences of non-elite people. Containing 25 million words of text, they record the evidence given at and outcome of 100,000 trials held at the Old Bailey. This project has created a searchable text-base, that can be used for free text searching, structured searching of marked-up text, and statistical analysis. This resource has been made available online and free of charge to any one with an internet connection.

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Victorian Social Reform: A Bibliography of the Published Papers of the Social Science Association 1857-86

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, known as the Social Science Association, was an influential forum for the development of social policy between the 1850s and 1880s to which many notable Victorians gave papers and addresses. Leading politicians, intellectuals, bureaucrats, churchmen and businessmen were among its members. It was influential in many different areas - legal reform, penal policy, education, public health and commercial relations – and provides vivid insight into Victorian social and institutional development.

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The Newton Manuscript Project

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Newton Manuscript Project began in January 2000 with a view to preparing 20 print volumes of Newton's non-scientific papers. Although we had stated in the initial application that that we would make the text of the proposed print edition available online, we quickly realised that the online environment now offered extraordinary and unrivalled possibilities for disseminating high quality scholarly output to a variety of audiences. Accordingly, we switched our primary focus to producing an electronic edition of Newton’s non-scientific papers.

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British Fiction, 1800-1829: A Database of Production, Circulation and Reception History

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception (DBF) arises from more than fifteen years’ general research into Romantic-era British fiction, by the project director, Professor Peter Garside. The project provides a comprehensive bibliographical record of the production of fiction during the first three decades of the nineteenth century, supplemented by a variety of contextual secondary materials drawn from the period.

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The St Alban's Psalter: on the Web

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

To digitise the St Albans Psalter and place it on the web. The images are accompanied by complete transcription, translation (Latin into both English and German). Each image has a page-by-page commentary, and the manuscript is amplified by about 40,000 words of accompanying essays.
Aims: to make the psalter available in colour.
Research questions: to understand how the manuscript was made, when, for whom, and why the range of images were chosen.

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Law making in Wales: an on-line analysis

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

On 1 July 1999 the National Assembly for Wales came into existence. Its functions were, and continue to be, transferred by Orders in Council and Acts of Parliament. This is a unique arrangement under the various devolution settlements introduced in the UK at this time. A basic element of the rule of law is that citizens can access the law. It was not apparent to the project team that the National Assembly had any plans to make its functions routinely accessible to any user, whether these were transferred to it, or functions that it legislated for itself under its statutory powers.

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The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland

Posted by arts-humanities.net on March 29, 2015

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) is an evolving electronic archive of British and Irish Romanesque stone sculpture.

ROMANESQUE SCULPTURE

Romanesque sculpture marks a high point of artistic production in Britain and Ireland, corresponding to the boom in high-quality building that followed the Norman Conquest in 1066, and reflecting a new set of links with mainland Europe. A good deal of this sculpture remains in parish churches and cathedrals, houses and halls, castles and museums throughout these isles.

PRESERVATION

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