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Digital Kipling

Posted by Roger Gillis on May 24, 2017

The Dalhousie Kipling Collection has an international reputation as being the most comprehensive in the world.
Not only does it contain a comprehensive collection of Rudyard Kipling’s published works but it has also holds
significant research ephemera support material about and by Kipling published during his lifetime – the Kipling scrapbooks
being prime among them. The Digital Kipling project is an effort to digitize the Kipling Scrapbooks, make them more readily accessible,

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Digital Kipling

Posted by Roger Gillis on May 24, 2017

The Dalhousie Kipling Collection has an international reputation as being the most comprehensive in the world.
Not only does it contain a comprehensive collection of Rudyard Kipling’s published works but it has also holds
significant research ephemera support material about and by Kipling published during his lifetime – the Kipling scrapbooks
being prime among them. The Digital Kipling project is an effort to bring the Kipling Scrapbooks more readily accessible

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Paperbound Watermarks

Posted by S C Kaplan on May 2, 2016

Paperbound is a digital repository for photographs of Western European watermarks from c. 1300 to 1550. It is still under construction, but becoming more funcitonal by the day. We are primarily looking for collaboration in the form of submissions of images of watermarks with the pertinent necessary data (the appropriate form can be accessed at http://www.paperbound-watermarks/contribute), but are happy to receive other feedback and suggestions.

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Digital Zombies

Posted by juliette Levy on August 13, 2015

Digital Zombies is a hybrid research experience that leads students through digital and physical collections in libraries while teaching them the basics of scholarly historical research. The sequence of tasks constitute a meaningful play activity – not a video game or even a gamification – but it is firmly a digital experience, as students learn to navigate digital collections, learn to search online for books that are in the library, and develop digital literacy around search engines, file submissions and file formats.

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Text Mining of Television Transcripts

Posted by Liorah Golomb on January 27, 2015

I am looking for a collaborator with computational linguistic skills for a project mining the dialogue of the U.S. television program Supernatural (CW Network, 2005-present). My goal is to demonstrate, through textual analysis, the originality of the dialogue, the breadth of words and phrases used by the writers, the way language is used to distinguish characters and reveal character traits, etc.The product of this project will be an article for publication in a peer-reviewed venue.

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Beyond Citation: Critical Thinking About Digital Research

Posted by Eileen Clancy on December 28, 2014

We want to be the "Missing Manual" for digital research collections. While the use of databases such as ProQuest’s Historical Newspapers or Gales’ Nineteenth Century Collections Online is common, these tools have largely escaped critique by traditional humanities scholars. Knowledge of the way proprietary databases work is limited because their structures and content are opaque. As a result, scholars may not be able to discover the provenance of documents or to understand why certain search results are returned.

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The History of Contemporary Russia

Posted by Andrey Yanik on October 8, 2014

The History of Contemporary Russia (HCR) is an interdisciplinary peer-populated platform (in Russian) for researches, teachers, as well as for everybody interested in history of USSR and Russia of late 20th – early 21st centuries.
The HCR is online depository for a detailed chronicle of the events that occurred in USSR and Russia during the period from 1985 through 2000, which is often called the “era of changes” by the researchers. Thousands of verified facts backed up by the references to relevant full-text documentary sources.

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America's Least Popular War: Augmented War of 1812

Posted by Kathleen Hulser on September 7, 2014

Augmented War of 1812 is the first chapter in a series of public history augmented reality projects, using smart phones to bring primary sources into outdoor spaces via augmented reality apps. In phase one of the project, focused on the War of 1812 in New York, augmented realities depicted a coast guard cutter chasing a smuggler in the Hudson, a sailor disembarking on Governor's Island near Castle William, a fortification built during the war, and an image of Cap. Lawrenece floating over his tomb "Dont' Give Up the Ship," in Trinity Cemetery.

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