Humanities

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The James Malcolm Rymer Collection

Posted by Rebecca Nesvet on August 10, 2017

The James Malcolm Rymer Collection is an open-access collection of documentary editions of the works of James Malcolm Rymer (1814-84), creator of the Dracula precursor Varney the Vampire and Sweeney Todd. The first text to be added is Rymer's The String of Pearls, or the Barber of Fleet Street (1850), with transcription, encoding, annotations, and graphic and web design primarily by undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay. We have some project collaborators outside UWGB and are interested in hearing from anyone who wants to get involved.

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Programming Historian

Posted by fred Gibbs on March 30, 2015

The Programming Historian is an online, open access, peer reviewed suite of over 30 tutorials that help humanists (though slanted towards historians) learn a wide range of digital tools, techniques, and workflows to facilitate their research. Despite the name, we do not focus exclusively on programming, but rather aim to provide guidance on a variety of digital methods and approaches.

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Neatline

Posted by Ronda Grizzle on August 13, 2014

Neatline is a geotemporal exhibit-builder that allows you to create beautiful, complex maps, image annotations, and narrative sequences from Omeka collections of archives and artifacts, and to connect your maps and narratives with timelines that are more-than-usually sensitive to ambiguity and nuance. Neatline lets you make hand-crafted, interactive stories as interpretive expressions of a single document or a whole archival or cultural heritage collection.

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HuNI: Humanities Networked Infrastructure

Posted by Toby Burrows on December 11, 2012

The HuNI Project is integrating 28 of Australia’s most important cultural datasets into a ‘virtual laboratory’. These datasets comprise more than 2 million authoritative records relating to the people, objects and events that make up the country’s rich heritage.

The HuNI Virtual Laboratory will facilitate specialist research and help to break down barriers between disciplines and uncover new insights into Australia’s cultural landscape.

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Introducing Research and Collaboration Methods to Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Posted by Elizabeth Cornell on November 12, 2011

Essentially, I'm designing a research methods class / workshop for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as researchers that introduces them to the many rich digital tools available to the humanities. The aim, however, is not to diminish the importance of text-only papers or books in favor of showstoppers filled with links and videos.

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